Tuesday, July 29, 2008

Judge rules, Open the Can - UPDATED

UPDATED:

Former Blue Lake Police Chief David Gundersen has been cleared of all major charges first filed against him in 2008. - Arcata Eye MARCH 2012

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☛ TS Gundersen's ex-wife to testify
☛ ER Ex-wife’s testimony will be heard
Superior Court Judge W. Bruce Watson ruled Monday that testimony from the ex-wife of former Blue Lake Police Chief David Gundersen will be admissible.

Previous post: Opening the can of worms
Related coverage, with links

UPDATED:

Former Blue Lake Police Chief David Gundersen has been cleared of all major charges first filed against him in 2008. - Arcata Eye MARCH 2012

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4 comments:

Anonymous said...

so the prosecutor is going to put on a lame witness with a lot of baggage to say she's not sure but maybe something happened. then the defense lawyer is going to put all that baggage on display, framed by the fact that the witness in the bitter custody fight just happens to be represented by the DA's wife?
And this is to impress the jury with the strength of the prosecution? Rape cases are always tilted toward the prosecutor because the default setting by the jury is "why would she make this up?" Putting on your wife's angry and bitter client to back up the "victim" you had to drag screaming into the court is an interesting
approach. Should be fun to watch, however it turns out.

red said...

In the category of "be careful what you wish for"... 2:41 has it about right. This allows Clanton to get into a lot of things he would not otherwise be able to raise. But I am sure that PVG has considered all that.

Anonymous said...

You are so right, 2:41. Another woman saying that Gundersen raped her with the use of drugs will show the jury that Gundersen is innocent. HAHA!

Anonymous said...

1041 doesn't read for detail, does s/he? See, that's how PVG assesses cases. Facts? I don't need no stinkin'facts. However, as recent cases point out, juries actually, sometimes, pay attention to what the witnesses say and how they say it. Appellate courts, also, sometimes read the record. Not just the newspapers.