Wednesday, December 17, 2008

Well, whaddya know?

Hurwitz, FDIC settle 20-year feud (Update)
Houston financier Charles Hurwitz said he's accepted a $10 million payment to settle his legal battle with the Federal Deposit Insurance Corp....

24 comments:

  1. You sound pleasantly surprised-

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  2. Government has been slopping this fat hog with public assets far too long. He should have had his nuts cut first.

    Dreadful Anonymous

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  3. First let me say I think Hurwitz stinks.

    Second, he gets this money because the government stunk even worse and abused their authority.

    Third, we should cut your nuts of Dreadful Anonymous, DA or Dumb Ass. That is if you have any, which I highly doubt.

    Now go bugger David Cobb and Kaitlin.

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  4. First let me say I think Hurwitz stinks.

    Second, he gets this money because the government stunk even worse and abused their authority.

    Third, we should cut your nuts of Dreadful Anonymous, DA or Dumb Ass. That is if you have any, which I highly doubt.

    Now go bugger David Cobb and Kaitlin.

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  5. Hopelessly irrational, self-contradictory, and absurd, Mr. Anonymous. You are a shining example of democracy's weakest link. You are that nine month long nightmare that came true. What a disappointment you must be to your family. Stop drooling! And go brush your teeth.

    Dreadful Anonymous

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  6. Sigh.

    Can we ever just discuss the damn issue?

    This was a hard fought case, which you heard almost nothing about because the only stories that see the light of day are the hate-Hurwitz stories that fit the robber-baron meme.

    The judge's findings in this case were extraordinarily damning of the Federal Govt. trying to steal land.

    Hurwitz or not, that's a big deal. The original judgement was 72 million, I think.

    The judge compared the government to the Mafia.

    It is also a story about environmental groups playing the halls of Congress, and pushing the deal, flexing muscle that has grown to gargantuan proportions today.

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  7. The judges findings should have been extraordinarily damning of Charles 'Wild Hog' Hurwitz. Hurwitz should have been indicted 20 years ago. Not that the recidivist would have found God and started his own prison ministries. But, he wouldn't have destroyed Palco timberland and the incomes of so many families who had worked for generations for that company. Palco was a public asset for Humboldt County, and you continue to defend Hurwitz, Rose.

    Dred

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  8. Just more proof that anyone in the future who decides to negotiate a deal such as Headwaters, to set aside lands, and ostensibly give the activists what they want will NOT end up with a fair deal.

    The activists will never be satisfied. The object of the negotiation is not what they really want.

    Headwaters is not what they really wanted.

    Better to say No Deal. You're in for the same rough waters no matter what you do.

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  9. Dred - you are too caught up with yourself to see that the goverment was mafioso here and that is why they paid the penalty. Your hatred for Hurwitz has blinded you to others criminal like behavior. I am sorry, that the government acted like this is very very bad. Its wrong and heads should roll. But, keep on saying that those who see differently than you are irrational or a nine month nightmare. I have some good guesses who you are dred...keep it up.

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  10. I'm glad to see Hurwitz received at least some compensation for the millions he spent over 20 years to defend himself against a pot fueled earth first dream brought to life by corrupt government officials. It's about time there was some accountability. It's just a shame that some of the officials and instigators don't have to personally pay the fine and it falls on the rest of society to make up their slack.

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  11. The Headwaters deal paid $480 million to the Maxxam Corporation. Some last minute back room deal making between Hurwitz and politicians created the Incidental Take Permit that blew a big loophole in the Endangered Species Act. Environmentalists had been fighting to protect the Headwaters Forest for ten years and were not on-board - in fact, strongly protested the Incidental Take Permit as part of the Habitat Conservation Plan. Other last minute loopholes allowed Maxxam/PL to cut on steep slope and slide areas that did nothing to preserve habitat or protect species. Environmental degradation, profitable to Maxxam/PL, left a price to be paid by salmon fisheries, private property owners, Humboldt County residents and tax payers, while the company operated, often in severe violation of the Clean Water Act.

    You guys are confused. You don't know your Dudley Dewright from your Snidely Whiplash and you have forgotten that poor Nell was tied to the railroad tracks. You ought to have been home schooled and your mothers shouldn't have drank alcohol and smoked during pregnancy. It ain't your fault, I know. But, Hurwitz isn't worth your sorrow, no matter how much you hate the government.

    Dreadful Anonymous

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  12. How many lawsuits were filed against him, Dred?

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  13. Remember Bob Martel, who said his suit against Palco cost him $250,000 and took five years of research?

    When he lost, The 5th Circuit Court of Appeals ordered him to pay the company legal fees of more than $110,000. And he said he hadn't earned "more than six thousand dollars in a year in recent memory"

    And you wonder - who paid those bills? Who paid the $250,000 that he couldn't possibly have afforded? Plus the more than $110,000. Has he been making monthly payments all this time?

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  14. A June 4, 1993 article in the New York Times says that Bill Bertain who spends most of his time and much of his money on the legal battle with Mr. Hurwitz was "more than a half-million dollars in debt. At times he has been unable to meet his house payments, and his health has deterioriated."

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  15. Who is/was Bob Martel? The "Executive Director" of "Humboldt Watershed Council"

    In April of 2000 the North Coast Journal reported that "Local activist Bob Martel received an expensive setback this week in his ongoing battle against Pacific Lumber and its parent company, MAXXAM. The 5th Circuit Court of Appeals rejected Martel's appeal to an earlier decision in MAXXAM's favor and ordered him to pay the company legal fees of more than $110,000.

    The case concerns the failure in 1988 of a savings and loan association in which MAXXAM and its chairman, Charles Hurwitz, were investors. Martel contends that Hurwitz exercised control over the company; Hurwitz denies the charges. Related cases are still pending, but the court ruled that Martel's case was "frivolous."

    Martel disputes that claim, saying that the suit cost him $250,000 and took five years of research. That, he said, "doesn't actually fit the definition of frivolous."

    As to how he might pay the legal fees awarded by the court, Martel said he hasn't earned "more than six thousand dollars in a year in recent memory"...

    ...Hughes ruled that Martel's suit was "abusive litigation" because Martel had based much of his suit on information garnered from newspaper reports. Hughes also said Martel, who had filed the suit as a taxpayer, lacked standing to sue on behalf of the federal government.

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  16. In a separate case, the Garberville-based Environmental Protection Information Center was ordered to pay Pacific Lumber $17,731 in legal costs as a result of a June 1997 lawsuit. EPIC sued PL in March of 1995, maintaining that the California Department of Forestry should have prepared an environmental impact study before it granted the company a salvage-logging permit for spotted owl habitat now protected as part of the Headwaters Reserve.

    EPIC spokesperson Kevin Bundy said U.S. District court judge Louis Bechtle dismissed the suit because EPIC "couldn't convince the court (salvage logging) would violate the endangered species act."

    John A. Campbell, PL president, recently issued a statement saying PL is entitled to the court costs.

    "The favorable court ruling highlighted that salvage and other logging would not cause a take of endangered species," he said. "The court ... made clear in this case that endangered species would benefit from the working relationship developed by Pacific Lumber, federal wildlife agencies and the California Department of Forestry."

    Bundy said the amount EPIC must pay is a fraction of the $700,000 PL originally requested to cover fees.

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  17. I KNOW how you like cut'n paste, dred...


    In other coverage, it is reported that: "Judge Hughes characterized Martel's pleading as "Regurgitating politicized half-truths" ...Describing Martel as "a bystander" who "knows nothing, saw nothing, did nothing," U.S. District Court Judge Lynn N. Hughes determined that Martel "lacks standing, was not the original source of the information, and filed his suit too late." Martel filed suit in January 1995, saying he was bringing the action on behalf of the U.S. government; however, the U.S. government declined to participate in the suit.

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  18. From 1999 through 2004 Maxxam/PL committed 325 state issued violations, many causing severe, irreparable harm to fish and wildlife species.

    You only talk about cases lost against Maxxam/PL and what it's cost the county. Why don't you cut and paste cases that have been won.

    Charles 'Wild Hog' Hurwitz, all he ever did was wring every bit of wealth out of his ill-gotten companies, including employee pensions. In the end, he left devastated watersheds, timberlands, and PL families. He also left Humboldt County residents and tax payers with a ruined economy, coping with flooding, poor water quality, a few Coho and Rose, the girl that loved him.

    Dred

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  19. The unregulated orgs have been given statutory right to sue. Activist groups use that as a weapon.

    It's become big business. When an attempt fails because some piece of the law doesn't line up, they have friendly legislators who fix that.

    These "groups" pose as grassroots-citizen-led entities, and they pretend to be acting 'in the public interest'. To demonstrate their piety, they write into their grant applications that they will do outreach to schools - so they go give a couple of presentations and meet that requirement, which also serves as a foil for their IRS requirements.

    But what they are about is power and money.

    You know this, dred. Maybe you're part of it.

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  20. Oh we are much better organized than you know. We operate a sperm bank and have available upon request a stud book for your perusal. Our donors are chosen on the bases of high I.Q. and a predilection for public service. All donors must meet high specifications for compassion for all living things and a deep love for the natural environment.

    Dreadful Anonymous

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  21. EPIC is nothing but a sham that sues corporations in the hopes of winning 1 in 10 by getting an incompetent judge. Business is no longer big business providing jobs on the North Coast, it's suing corporations who might have the funds to pay off a lawsuit. To see how well they make out with their tax free status take a drive out Jacoby Creek Rd to check out the digs of EPIC's director; and is that new building going up behind his house permitted?

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  22. Who is EPIC'S director?

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  23. Isn't weird how those corporations that are big enough to do major harm to the environment often have money and an expensive law firm on retainer. EPIC defends citizens rights to a healthy environment.

    Dred

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